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Mapping NH's Growth Through the Decades

Executive Summary

Date: June 26th, 2013

New Hampshire experienced a period of profound demographic change from the 1960s through the 2000s. These three maps help illustrate that change. They show population density for every New Hampshire city and town, with figures from the 2010, 1990 and 1960 Censuses. By sliding between the maps, you see the gradual increase in population -- and how it differs across the state -- over that period.

Click on any town to get demographic info for that community (median income, median age, poverty rate, etc.) We've included the statewide figures in each window, too. The last map illustrates the median age of each New Hampshire community. Take note of the regional variations. How might those differences shape policy discussions across the state?

These maps supplement our annual "What is New Hampshire?" report, which you can download using the link in the right-hand column of this page.

2010 Population Density by Municipality

Map Colors show 2010 Population Density for each municipality in New Hampshire.

0 to 100 People per square mile| 100 to 500 People per square mile| 500 to 1,000 People per square mile| 1,000 to 3,000 People per square mile

 

1990 Population Density by Municipality

0 to 100 People per square mile| 100 to 500 People per square mile| 500 to 1,000 People per square mile| 1,000 to 3,000 People per square mile

 

1960 Population Density by Municipality

0 to 100 People per square mile| 100 to 500 People per square mile| 500 to 1,000 People per square mile| 1,000 to 3,000 People per square mile

NH Population Median Age by Town, 2010

The most recent Census numbers help paint a more detailed portrait of New Hampshire’s demographic patterns. In this map, the darker the shade of the community, the older the median age of its residents. (The statewide median age was 41.1 years in 2010, up from 37.1 in 2000.)

We see here that New Hampshire can essentially be divided into two regions when it comes to age: an older northern half, and a younger southern half. But even in the “younger” half, there is a further subdivision, with the eastern region – between Interstate 93 and the Seacoast -- significantly younger than the western portion.

Age 20 to 41| Age 41 to 44| Age 44 to 48| Age 48 to 62| No Data

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